An Enneagram In Education Page Just For You!

Just jumping on really fast to let you know that I’ve made a new feature on the blog- an Enneagram in Education page WITH BUTTONS! I don’t know about you, but for me, it’s so satisfying to click on a link with a button instead of a long URL. Much more aesthetically pleasing as well!

Click on your enneagram type and it’ll bring you straight to the post about your enneagram type and the learning style that comes with it. It may teach you a thing or two about yourself in a classroom setting and how best to get the most out of your education!

As of now, I have not written about every type yet, so not all are up. By the end of the year I will have gotten to all nine types. Enjoy!

Cover photo by infographicnow

Enneagram In Education: Type Four

This is part of a series using enneagram in education. For more information on why enneagram in education, refer to this post.

Enneagram type 4, the romantic, or the individualist. 

A few words to describe this type: 

Creative. 

Intuitive.

Daydreamers.

Withdrawn.

Sensitive.

Artistic. 

Let’s pull this into a classroom setting. If you’re an enneagram type four, you’re the daydreamer in the back of the classroom doodling in a notebook. Your key motivator as a type four is to be unique and different, always having the most artistic work. As a true artist, you’re very focused on what’s missing. Whether that’s within yourself, or in your work. You can also be sensitive to criticism, feelings can be hurt when something negative comes up.

How to get the most out of your education as a type four. 

  • Don’t just focus on the negative of feedback, remember to focus on the positive as well.
  • Embrace the artistic side of you and find a way to make your work creative. 
  • Get involved in deep conversations with peers about topics that are interesting to you. 
  • Create aestically pleasing notes and workspace for school work to motivate you. 

Highly personal, individualistic, “true to self.” Self-revealing, emotionally honest, humane. Ironic view of self and life: can be serious and funny, vulnerable and emotionally strong.

– The Enneagram Institute 

Type 4’s go to type 1 in growth and type 2 in stress. 

Are you a type 4? What is important for you to have a successful learning environment? 

Cover photo: Enneagram Worldwide 

Enneagram In Education: Type Three

This is part of a series using enneagram in education. For more information on why enneagram in education, refer to this post.

Enneagram type 3, the performer, or the achiever. 

A few words to describe this type: 

Motivated. 

Social. 

Encouraging. 

Confident. 

Hard Working. 

Goal-Setter. 

Competitive. 

Let’s pull this into a classroom setting. If you’re an enneagram type three, you’re the charmer of the class. Obtaining the highest achievement is your ultimate goal, and merely speaking of plans and “what-ifs” can drive you crazy, jumping into action is what you would rather be doing. As you speak with your peers it can be fast-paced and exciting if it’s an assignment you are particularly steered towards. You work well in groups, yet you are constantly driven by fear that you’ll fail, whether it’s in your peer’s eyes, or if your classmates will be the reason you fail an assignment. 

How to get the most out of your education as a type three. 

  • Find ways for praise- be open with your teachers about your need for feedback. 
  • Choose a career path you are passionate about. 
  • Hands-on school work is ideal. 
  • Find how certain topics of study can be applied to your real life. 
  • Be patient with peers that may not be as energetic and driven as you may be. 

“Threes are often successful and well liked because, of all the types, they most believe in themselves and in developing their talents and capacities.”

– The Enneagram Institute 

Type 3’s go to type 6 in growth and type 9 in stress. 

Are you a type 3? What is important for you to have a successful learning environment? 

Cover photo: The Enneagram Institute 

Enneagram In Education: Type Two

This is part of a series using enneagram in education. For more information on why enneagram in education, refer to this post.

Enneagram type 2, the helper, or the giver. 

A few words to describe this type: 

People Pleaser. 
Emotional Connection. 
Relationships. 
Feelings. 
Attention. 
Empathetic. 
Aware of Others. 

Let’s pull this into a classroom setting. If you’re an enneagram type two, you are in the heart of the group work. Constantly trying to work with peers and help them achieve the same academic greatness that you strive for. You often act differently in individual classes based on your teacher’s personality type or preference, because your goal is to aim to please. Role models in your desired profession are your driving force to continue in your education. 

How to get the most out of your education as a type two. 

  • Make personal connections with peers and teachers.  
  • As well as personal connections with your schoolwork. 
  • Be careful in group work not to take responsibility for all of the assignments, spread it evenly among peers. 
  • If possible, choose smaller, more personal classroom settings. 
  • Realize that your grades are not a personal reflection of what a teacher thinks about you. 
  • Remember to meet your own needs before you can meet others’. 

“[Two’s are] Encouraging and appreciative, able to see the good in others. Service is important, but takes care of self too: they are nurturing, generous, and giving—a truly loving person.

– The Enneagram Institute 

Type 2’s go to type 4 in growth and type 8 in stress. 

Are you a type 2? What is important for you to have a successful learning environment? 

Cover photo: The Enneagram Institute 

Enneagram In Education: Type 1

Enneagram type 1, the perfectionist or the reformer. 

A few words to describe this type: 

Striving for more. 
High integrity. 
Idealist. 
Ethical. 
Inspiring. 
Never flexible. 
Responsible. 

Let’s pull this into a classroom setting. If you’re an enneagram type one, you are typically self driven. You’re the kid in the front of the classroom taking avid notes on everything the teacher says. The motivation behind a type one student is to be correct and have all of the right answers. 

How to get the most out of your education as a type one. 

  • Learn in a logical, strategic way. 
  • Know the step by step process to assignments and classroom structure in general. 
  • If possible, in group work settings, don’t choose friends, choose those that you know will work hard and get the job done to the same level of perfection as you. 
  • Keep a planner and update it often. 
  • If your teacher isn’t challenging you enough, challenge yourself. 
  • Keep as organized as possible.

“Dissatisfied with reality, they become high-minded idealists, feeling that it is up to them to improve everything: crusaders, advocates, critics. Into “causes” and explaining to others how things “ought” to be.”

– The Enneagram Institute 

Type 1’s go to type 7 in growth, and type 4 in stress. 

Are you a type 1? What is important for you to have a successful learning environment? 

Cover photo: The Enneagram Institute 

An Introduction To Using Enneagram In Education

Let’s talk enneagram! I want to do a segment on the enneagram personality type and how it can help us understand how we learn. I did a segment on Myers-Briggs type indicator last year and felt inclined to highlight enneagram as well. 

Why is it important to know personality type when it comes to education? 

“When we study nine personality types of the Enneagram, we can better understand how and why others see the world differently from us. This awareness leads to greater compassion and acceptance of others. We can apply this knowledge to adapt our teaching style (sometimes in very small ways) to make a big difference in how well our students learn. In the classroom, the Enneagram can help teachers and students connect to be effective partners in education.” –Rob Fitzel 

We as humans see the world one way, but can be confused or misunderstanding when others see the world in a different way. Understanding enneagram types of not only ourselves but others can be a great fix for this. Having validation of the best learning environment for yourself can also set you up for success. There are so many different ways to study and take notes, so having this knowledge can give you the chance to find your groove of learning faster. 

What is enneagram?

It is not just an indicator of personality, but dives deep into someone and finds their core beliefs, why they make decisions, and the driving factor behind our actions and feelings. The symbol for enneagram is a web of sorts because each type takes on different aspects of other types during growth and stress. For example, a type one will lean towards a type 4 personality in stress and a type 7 during growth. For the sake of simplicity, I will not be diving too deep into this topic. If it is something you wish to delve deeper into, I will have additional websites linked below with further information. 

How do you find your type?

There are multiple tests you can take to determine this, but I have not found one specific test that I lean towards using, so I will leave finding a test up to you. Perhaps the best way you can find your personality type is research, research, research! Learning about every single type and finding which ones you can identify with most. 

I’m excited to dive in deep to this learning context with you! Come back next week to learn about type 1’s, what their personality entails, and how they learn best. 

What is your enneagram personality type? 

Other resources for learning more about enneagram and finding your personality type: 

https://www.enneagraminstitute.com/type-descriptions

Instagram accounts to follow:

https://instagram.com/enneagramashton?igshid=1e9rhqb1pkpfy

https://instagram.com/enneagramexplained?igshid=k6s80x81thcv

The Conclusion Of My MBTI Research: My Learning Summarized

This is part of a series of using Myers Briggs personality types in the classroom. For more information, click here. For information on how to figure out your student’s MBTI type, click here. 

In the last few months, I have analyzed all 16 Meyers Briggs personality types. Last week I wrote my 16th post in the series, the final personality type explained. Seeing my research come to an end was sad for me because I’ve dedicated so much time and interest in the subject. A few takeaways I ended  with were this: 

Figuring out student’s personality types can be hard and time-consuming, but also incredibly awarding if you’re willing to put in the work. 

You don’t necessarily need to know their MBTI personality type to know them better. Start with identifying introverts and extroverts and using that information to guide your teaching. Move on to identifying sensing versus intuitive students and then use that as well. 

Students can be aware of MBTI types as well to help them interact with other teachers and peers. 

When comparing personality types, they can be very similar and vastly different at the same time. 

There are not necessarily pros and cons to a personality type, just differences in how we think and who we are. 

Jane Kise has done extensive research on MBTI in the classroom. If I cannot convince you how beneficial is it, maybe she can with her TedTalk. Notice that she doesn’t find conclusive evidence by the majority of students acting and reacting in certain ways, but because every single student of the same personality type has the same actions. 

In the future, look for a post with links to each of the personality types to learn more about how to use your knowledge of MBTI in the classroom. Until then, share with me! How has your knowledge of MBTI helped you in your classroom? 

featured image: thedailybeast.com