Teaching the Judging Type: Using Myers Briggs in the Classroom

This post is part of a series of posts on teaching to different personality type indicators as found in the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. To see more, head here.

In the Myers-Briggs world, Judging vs Perceiving is how we interact with the outside world. Between the two, we will use both of them, but our natural instincts are to move toward one versus the other. This post is focusing on the Judging types in the classroom. 

Traits that can define a Judging type: 

Organized. 

Always planning. 

Neat and tidy. 

Knows what they are doing in the future. 

How to pick out a Judging type in the classroom: These will be your students with the neat and tidy desks. They will be the ones constantly asking what the rest of the day, week, and month hold as far as what they will be doing in school. 

How to support a Judging type in the classroom: Keep things as consistent as possible. Trust that majority of time they are on top of their assignments and can likely handle more, if needed. Giving them an overview of the day’s schedule can be wonderful for them, they want to know what’s next and how these events affect other events. 

How to help a Judging type grow in the classroom: Give them support through activities that are in a go-with-the-flow situation instead of structured and predictable. Pair them with a Perceiving type during a group project to give them the opportunity to see both sides of how a project can be completed. 

Do you have any tried and true tips for teaching students that are the Judging type? 

Sometimes, I’m Not A Good Teacher

I walked into my classroom one day just feeling… off. That’s the best way I can describe it. I was tired and already annoyed before my students had even walked into the classroom. I didn’t greet them at the door like I typically did, and found myself bothered by the fact that they all walked into the classroom talking with one another. 

The morning was dragging on, it felt hard to get through our morning meeting, 15 minute phonics lesson, and reading groups. FINALLY, it was time for recess! But then I remembered something awful….. I had recess duty! It was the perfect way to make my day even worse. By the time 28 sweaty kids, plus myself, walked back into our classroom, a classroom with NO air conditioning, mind you, I was just done. My kids asked if they could do some free drawing during our read aloud time and I snapped at them. During our math lesson I was not tolerating any funny business, whatsoever. 

I was not a good teacher that day, and worse off, I was down on myself for not being a good teacher. Finally, the day ended and all 29 of us went our separate ways. On my drive home I recounted my day and regretted being so short and unhappy with my class. Did they deserve to be the ones taking the brunt end of my bad day? No! They talked a little extra and were a little extra loud in the hallway, so what? They are first graders. They deserve some grace! 

I ended my drive trying to figure out how to make it up to them the next day in class. Plenty of ideas flew through my mind. Ice cream party? No. Extra long recess? Not good enough. Then, finally it came to my mind. 

The next morning I greeted each one of my students at the door with a smile and directed them to the rug to start our morning meeting a little earlier than normal. I had them all seated in front of me and told them I had something important to tell them, and with eager eyes they looked up at me waiting to hear what I had to say. 

Then, I sat in front of all of my kids and apologized. I opened up my heart and was vulnerable in front of these 6 and 7 year olds. I admitted my mistake and let them know that it wasn’t their fault that I had an off day. I told them they are really great kids and that I was extremely lucky to be their teacher, and I meant it! And I told them we would have a better day. 

And we did! 

Here’s what I learned from that day. First, it sucks to have bad days! It’s hard to walk away from a day feeling defeated and regret your decisions. But it’s also okay to have those days. A bad day of teaching does not make you a bad teacher. 

But here is the part that is the most important to remember: 

It’s okay to have those bad days if you take the time to reflect on them and troubleshoot the day (or situation), so that next time you’re in that situation you can handle it a little better. It absolutely will not be perfect, but it’ll be a stair step process as you troubleshoot the next bad day and try to improve each time after. This is what leads you to the tools you need to cope with the bad teaching days. Troubleshooting and trying again. It’s what we teach our students to do anyway, isn’t it?! 

You’re not a bad teacher- it’s just a bad day. You’ve got this. 

Teaching Perceivers: Using MBTI In The Classroom

This post is part of a series of posts on teaching to different personality type indicators as found in the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. To see more, head here.

In the Myers-Briggs world, Judging vs Perceiving is how we interact with the outside world. Between the two, we will use both of them, but our natural instincts are to move toward one versus the other. This post is focusing on the Perceiving types in the classroom. 

Traits that can define a Perceiver: 

Flexible and spontaneous. 

Ready to adapt to whatever the world brings. 

Can seem messy, unorganized, or sporadic. 

They wait until the last minute to do their school work. Nearing deadlines are the best motivation for them! 

Perceiving types do not like to organize the world, they want the world to organize them. They are going to be your students with messy desks, typically turning in their assignments late, and paying little attention to the clock. They like to feel the room, watch their surroundings, and make decisions as they go, instead of lining it all out ahead of time. 

Ways to support a Perceiving type in the classroom- First and foremost, respect them! Perceiving types can get a bad rap because they do not follow social norms. However, this is their preferred way to interact with the world and will thrive if allowed to be themselves. Try to give them gentle reminders about deadlines, important dates, and events, if possible. 

Ways you can help a Perceiving type grow in the classroom- Give them hard, fast deadlines and hold them to it! Line out the daily schedule and be consistent with it so they can stay on track, but be respectful of their need to adapt to changing situations. 

A common misconception is that Perceiving types are not organized or do not have a plan. To Judging types, this seems sensible! However, they do have an organization system and they do have a plan, it only looks different from what you are expecting it to be. 

In my personal opinion, the Judging/Perceiving types are two opposite types that I believe can be the hardest types to understand each other when we are the opposite types. I am very much a Judging type, but I have many close friends and family that are Perceiving types. It’s frustrating for me that they will not create a plan and stick with it in our day to day interactions. While on the other hand, they become frustrated with me because I am constantly pushing them to make a plan, but they function with a go-with-the-flow attitude. 

That’s why I believe understanding these types in the classroom is essential for success! It can be helpful as a teacher to understand the opposite types so that when you inevitably end up with kids in your classroom that do not interact with the world the way you do, you can understand why and appreciate them for what they do. 

Choosing A Montessori School: Is It Right For You?

Let’s talk about Montessori schools! The term Montessori is thrown around a lot, especially recently, it’s become a very popular method among schools, caretakers, and parents. But what is the Montessori method? Here’s a quick introduction. 

Maria Montessori developed her method of learning as an Italian physician in the early 1900s. Her work focuses on children being independent in their learning and that they have a natural tendency for inquiry in learning. With the proper tools and set up, the child can be independent in their learning. The typical tools in a Montessori classroom are wooden, simple, and always at a child’s level.

Her work was never trademarked, so any school or center can tag “Montessori” onto their title and claim they teach Montessori method, but may not actually follow exactly what Maria developed. This is important to remember when looking into a Montessori school! 

A few facts about a Montessori school: 

If choosing a Montessori education, you may have to change your expectations of what school will look like for your children. They most likely will not be sitting in desks at any point in the day, but instead wandering and exploring and learning at their pace. 

Because the Montessori method is not a trademarked learning style, it is important to do research on specific schools to watch how they are learning and what the school’s style is to see if it meets the needs you are seeking. 

The Montessori method was well developed for elementary aged students, but Maria never created a curriculum for middle or high school students. Some schools have taken the Montessori principles and adjusted them to a high school level, creating a Montessori secondary education program, however, they may be few and far between. 

If you have chosen a Montessori program for your kids, how did you come to the conclusion that it was the right choice? 

Cover photo from thetot.com

It’s Graduation Day! Some Tips And Things To Bring

Graduation day is coming! Seniors, buckle up! This is your moment. First, take a look at this letter to the graduating class of 2020. All of it applies to you, too. 

Now let’s talk about what you need ON graduation day. It can be a really exciting day! Let’s make sure you don’t forget anything. 

  • First, make sure you talk with your school or organization before graduation day to know if they provide the cap and gown or if you need to. Look into what color of gown, cord, or stole that you need. 
  • Double-check the night before the event on where you are supposed to meet up before the ceremony, and that you know how to get there. Especially for those participating in college graduation.
  • Use the bathroom one last time before the ceremony. 
  • Take a lot of pictures, you’ll never want to forget this day. However, make sure those batteries are charged on your phone, camera, or any other electronic device you bring. 
  • Wear your semi-formal clothes under your gown, but keep in mind that everything on you must fit into your pockets, you won’t have a bag to tote with you, so keep your items at a minimum and try to wear an outfit that includes pockets, if possible. 
  • Sunscreen! This can be so easily overlooked, but a lot of spring graduation ceremonies happen outside. Even on a cloudy day, you can sunburn. 

Graduation day is a day to be celebrated! Pose for the pictures and allow yourself plenty of time in the limelight. You deserve it, after all! 

Teaching Feelers: Using Myers-Briggs In The Classroom

This post is part of a series of posts on teaching to different personality type indicators as found in the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. To see more, head here

According to Myers Briggs, when you are making decisions, you use two functions. Thinking and Feeling. You’ll use both through the whole decision-making process, but one will primarily take over. This blog post is to solely focus on the Feelers. 

Some traits that can define a Feeler: 

They are always considering the feelings of themselves and others in decision-making. 

They are the first to think of how a problem will affect others before they think about the process of the problem. 

When coming up with solutions to situations, they focus on people-oriented solutions and how we can work together instead of work better

They are your empathetic students. 

Feelers think more with their hearts and less with their heads. 

Ways you can support a Feeler in the classroom: allow them time to create personal connections to peers, teachers, and even the material you are studying. Consider their feelings in your conversations, if they do not feel supported, they can lose a lot of trust in the relationship, which is a vital part of their relationship with school in general. Let them be heard in their problem-solving. It may seem inefficient to use feelings while solving an analytical problem, but this is the way they need to process information. 

Ways you can push a Feeler in the classroom: challenge them to think analytically. Give them supported opportunities to push the feelings and emotions of others aside while they problem-solve. Pair them with a Thinking type so that both can see different ways to go about problem-solving. 

Have you been able to pick out the Feelers in your classroom? What tools do you use to support them? 

Your Guide To College Housing

High school seniors! Let’s talk about one thing that may be bringing you stress right now, housing! It can be hard to choose college housing because of all of the different types and pros and cons. Here is a general, quick guide that may be able to help you learn more and make an informed decision. 

The different types of housing in college: 

Dorms 

Resident Halls 

Sorority/ Fraternity 

Off-campus housing

Living at home 

On-campus: Some pros and cons, closer to classes. The great social aspect. Can have more rules for your living situation (smoking, alcohol, pets). Easier to know what’s happening at the school. There are different types of on-campus housing, which include dorms, resident halls, and sorority/ fraternity houses. 

Dorms are on-campus housing that can differ drastically in amenities/layout. Some dorms are strictly a room you sleep in with a community bathroom, laundry, and rec room space. It’s also required to sign up for a meal plan pass to eat at the dining halls since you do not have a kitchen in your dorm room. If you are looking for a great social aspect in college, this is it! 

Resident Halls are on-campus housing and typically have a more “apartment” set up. They have the rooms, bathrooms, living area, and kitchen all in the same apartment that you share with other roommates. 

Sorority/ Fraternity: These are places that can have housing available, but you must be a part of the sorority or fraternity to live in their housing. If you are looking for a social place to live and a way to be involved with your school, this a fantastic option! They can be on the spendier side though. 

Off-campus housing: You can also find housing off-campus in apartments, shared houses, and more. Off-campus housing is typically further from campus and may require a parking pass so you can park on campus because it is not close enough to walk. Or you may have to look into public transportation to get to campus. There may also be fewer rules in your housing because it is not endorsed by the school you are attending. 

Living at home: If you are attending school in or near your home town, living with your parents is an option, too! It would likely require a commute to school and could possibly have an effect on the social aspect of school. However, it could save a lot of money!

Some schools may have other housing options, but typically these are the main ones you can find on your campus. You can also make the decision of whether or not to live with friends, move in with strangers, or try to find a program that matches you with others in your field of study. 

There are so many options when it comes to college housing, as well as a long list of pros and cons when it comes to different places. What type of housing have you chosen or did choose in college and how did you come to that decision?